Updates

Availability, environmental performance and fuel costs: key factors for policymakers to consider ahead of votes on CO2 targets for cars

25 June 2018

GasNaturally, a platform of six associations from across the whole gas value chain, calls on the European Parliament committees to factor in the benefits of gas in transport when voting on the CO2 targets for cars proposal in July and September. Gas in transport is a mature and available technology, and it is a cost-efficient solution to reduce carbon emissions and improve air quality.

GasNaturally shares concerns expressed by ACEA on the need to consider affordable solutions when defining CO2 targets for cars. Prohibiting European consumers from accessing more affordable energy sources would strongly affect the CO2 reductions efforts in the transport sector. Instead, opting for a technology-neutral approach would guarantee a fair comparison of the CO2 footprint among different powertrains. It will help open the European markets to all available solutions and ensure full affordability across the high, medium and low-wealth EU Members States.

Affordability is a major factor in consumer uptake – market surveys show that in some regions an electric vehicle would need to cost €15 - €17K to be affordable to an average consumer.  This price is far from being the reality now. In contrast, gas cars are already affordable, and so is gas itself. Not only does gas help consumers to save on fuel, it also helps reduce climate-related emissions from transport.

Furthermore, the gas technology is ready and able to switch to a blend of renewable and natural gas, whereas the existing gas infrastructure can also accommodate the growing share of renewable gas.

Concentrating  efforts and resources on a single solution, in this case on electricity, would lead to limited emissions reductions results. It would also significantly delay the much needed GHG emission reductions in the transport sector – something that can be achieved with gas already today! The EU policymakers should look at all the readily-available and affordable solutions without forcing the system to accelerate only in one direction at the expense of consumers.